07 July 2015

Great Expectations – Generic Faith

Greetings Dear Reader,

When people talk about faith they do not always mean the same thing that I do.  It is a bad idea to assume that when someone else talks about faith that they mean the same thing that I do.  A generic faith is not the same as faith in Christ.

This does not mean that I discount anyone else’s faith.  I may not agree with the focus or tenets of other faith but that one has faith is a good beginning.  If I am to forgo unjust expectations I must realize that there is an exclusive arrogance to the things I believe. 

Christ claims to be the singular path to redemption.  This does not mean that I am better than anyone or that God thinks more highly of me than anyone else.  It does mean that others should hold me to a higher standard.  They should have a great expectation that I live my faith completely.

This does not mean that others get to dictate what that means.  I must be loving and kind.  It does not mean that I am being unloving if I consider something wrong.  How I express that thinking is vitally important.  I must disagree in love and compassion. 

The world should expect that the Church is the place to turn when there are troubles.  If we do not live up to that then we create dichotomy that we cannot ignore.  As we see the world slip the trances of the imposed morals and values of Christ followers we need to consider a question.  Have we lived up to the great expectations that are inherent with a faith that claims to be the way, the truth, and the life? 

I do not think we do.  We should not, therefore, be surprised when others reject or abandon it.  We cannot afford generic faith.  We must have life transforming faith grounded in barrier crushing love.  I cannot afford to compromise this.  It is the great expectation that God has for all of us who claim to love him.

Wishing you joy in the journey,

Aramis Thorn
Mat 13:52 So Jesus said to them, "That is why every writer who has become a disciple of Christ’s rule of the universe is like a home owner. He liberally hands out new and old things from his great treasure store.”

(͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

2 comments:

Patrick Sharp said...

This is an interesting discussion to have. Your piece talks about two things that seem opposed. You say that your faith has the exclusive arrogance of stating plainly that all other paths cannot lead to salvation and that this faith does not lead to God favoring anyone above anyone else.
How do you reconcile those ideas?
It seems to me that a person of this faith must judge someone outside of the faith to hold this truth. One can argue the details, but at it's core your faith seems to say to everyone else: "Your path is wrong and leads to a bad end."
What are your thoughts?

Patrick Sharp said...

This is an interesting discussion to have. Your piece talks about two things that seem opposed. You say that your faith has the exclusive arrogance of stating plainly that all other paths cannot lead to salvation and that this faith does not lead to God favoring anyone above anyone else.
How do you reconcile those ideas?
It seems to me that a person of this faith must judge someone outside of the faith to hold this truth. One can argue the details, but at it's core your faith seems to say to everyone else: "Your path is wrong and leads to a bad end."
What are your thoughts?