17 January 2020

Liturgy of the Common Man ~ Acceptable Responses


Greetings Dear Reader,

Years ago, I took a friend to a Lutheran church service because he wanted to understand different denominations.  His background was a denomination that did not have anything close to a systematized service.  I thought that I had prepared him well but I was wrong.  As the first hymn ended and the pastor approached the front of the platform, I was thinking about remembering the responses. The pastor canted, “The Lord be with you.”  The congregation responded “And also with you,” except for my friend.  At the top of his voice, he replied, “Amen! Preach it!”

It was interesting to see several hundred Lutherans turn to look at him as if turning and gawking was part of their practiced liturgical response.  The pastor smiled and commented that he loved a drift from the common from time to time.  I quietly explained things to my friend as the service continued.  When we consider liturgy, we understand that the cants and responses have a pattern and rhythm that we discussed earlier in the week.  Part of liturgy as well is that our responses are prescribed.  We read them from a book or memorize them.

In our Liturgy of the Common Man, we are much like the congregation of that church when the responses are not what we are used to or are acceptable to our ears.  We develop a series of social mores that dictate how we are supposed to respond to social situations.  At some level that is a good thing.  When, however, a society becomes divided as ours is, political correctness and prescribed speech become the norm, it is a problem.

A fractured society will push an agenda by choosing what is an allowed response to situations and what one should think of feel.  Sometimes, it is good to challenge the beliefs and norms of a culture.  If we are going to live by the law of love, we cannot purposely be offensive.  As a culture becomes more politically correct and engages in a position of what is acceptable, the circle of what is offensive grows larger.   Offenses become more onus and people become offended more easily.   The day becomes carpeted in eggshells. 

There are two responses here.  One is to realize that no one gets to tell me how I must respond to a situation other than the Father.  He already has.  We are to respond to everything in love and kindness.  The second is that we are responsible to be unoffendable.  We are to stand out in the easily offended world by being lovingly unoffendable.  Others may choose to be offended because of my choices.  I must not fight with others over things that do not matter.  I must hold on to my love and humility.

The Liturgy of the Common Man tells us that our responses must fit the approved words of the cantor.  The difficulty of this is that we are supposed to be salt and light in a world that will become increasingly offended by the Gospel.  We cannot change them.  We can, however, realize that we can live unoffended and refuse the liturgy that calls us to be anything other than loving followers of Christ.  It will result in the sound of crunching eggshells as we go and we will tread on a few toes simply by refusing to respond “properly” to the cant of the offended.  I will refuse to embrace the liturgy of the perpetually offended.  I will do my best to love everyone and be unoffendable.  I may stand out but I hope it is for the right reasons.

Wishing you joy in the journey,

Aramis Thorn
Mat 13:52 So Jesus said to them, "That is why every writer who has become a disciple of Christ’s rule of the universe is like a homeowner. He liberally hands out new and old things from his great treasure store.”
(͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

Contacts for Aramis Thorn:
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16 January 2020

Liturgy of the Common Man ~ Use Your Signal


Greetings Dear Reader,

My friend Tina often points out that one of the oddities of the community in which I live is that people will employ their turn signal to indicate that the person in front of him or her is turning.  There are also a vast number of people who have no idea that a turn signal exists in the vehicle they drive.  Still, we are a society that values indicators for our safety and movement.

We do the same thing socially.  In the Liturgy of the Common Man, we have a vast sea of social and virtue signals that we use to navigate our way through the day.  We discussed the cant and responses of the liturgy.  There are other social signals that we use to announce the group(s) with whom we identify.  How we dress, the symbols and talismans we carry, and even what we eat signals to others our response and standards within the liturgy. 

As part of the Liturgy of the Common Man, we express our desire to fit into society in ways that make it acceptable to the group-thought we value. We also see the social and virtue signals we value become common accessories and fashion statements.  The cross has become jewelry to many people.  Some do not even understand what it means to those of us who follow Christ. 

We even demand that others respond to the liturgy in the way we wish them to respond.  People decide that “meat is murder” and demand that no one enjoy a hamburger.  Things are deemed socially acceptable by a group of people.  That group insists that no matter what my values, I respond to their cants with the words and actions they deem acceptable.  We proclaim that we want equality, justice, and tolerance when in truth we want to let others live in freedom only if their responses match out cants. 

There are things that are wrong and we are not obligated to accept them or even participate in the liturgy that tries to justify them.  We must not reject others because their liturgy does not match ours.  The only virtue-signaling that really matters is that we are identified by our love for each other.  Out social signals of kindness, generosity, and grace are what matter.  We cannot afford to be distracted or offended by things outside of this. 

Our virtue signal must be to become lighthouses of love and kindness.  The seas are rough and the world is a dark and stormy place.  We need to give clear direction of where to go and who to follow.  The channel of love and faith is narrow and hard to find.  If that is, however, the cant we deliver in love and humility, it will be easier for others to respond. I wish to only signal love and grace from the one I follow Dear Reader.  I wish to be so committed to the signal of love for others that I cannot be offended by any liturgy that calls me to worship something less.


Which way are you going, which side will you be on
Will you stand and watch while all the seeds of hate are sown
Will you stand with those who say, let his will be done
One hand on the bible One hand on the gun
One hand on the bible One hand on the gun

Which way are you looking, is it hard to see
Do you say what’s wrong for him, is not wrong for me
You walk the streets, righteousness but you refuse to understand
You say you love the baby
Then you crucify the man
You say you love the baby
Then you crucify the man

Every day, things are changing, words once honored turned to lies
People wondering, can you blame them It's too far to run, and too late to hide

So, now you turn your back on, all the things that you used to preach
Now it’s let him live in freedom if he lives like me
Well you light has changed, confusion rains, what have you become
All your olive branches turned to spears
When your flowers turned to guns
Your olive branches turned to spears
When your flowers turned to guns

Wishing you joy in the journey,

Aramis Thorn
Mat 13:52 So Jesus said to them, "That is why every writer who has become a disciple of Christ’s rule of the universe is like a homeowner. He liberally hands out new and old things from his great treasure store.”
(͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

Contacts for Aramis Thorn:

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15 January 2020

Liturgy of the Common Man ~ The Cants of our Congress


Greetings Dear Reader,

For those of you unfamiliar with liturgy, part of the definition is that there are cants and responses.  The word “cant” has mostly a negative meaning outside of church services.  The idea of the cant in liturgy is different.  It is where we get the word cantor, who is someone that proclaims the phrases to which the congregation responds.

The most well-known example is this:
Cantor or Leader: “The Lord be with you.”
Congregation: “And also with you.”

We have a liturgy of communication in our liturgy of the common man as well.  There are the phrases that we utter to each other that keep communication between people at a safe level requiring little real engagement.  We praise Friday and disparage Monday.  We talk about “the game” and our approval or disapproval of the outcome.  The weather is either good or bad depending on whether it fits our plans and preferences. 

There is always the “How are you” and “Fine” part of the daily service.  We repeat this cant and response without even thinking about it.  I stole a response from Dave Ramsey that causes people to listen and even gives me a clue about who they are depending on the response.  My response to the “How are you” cant is “Better than I deserve.”  I use it primarily to remind myself that everything about my life is a blessing from the Father.  I am not getting what I deserve because I walk in the grace and mercy of Christ.

Instead of engaging with each other we have developed a liturgy that keeps us from having to be genuine and vulnerable.  We are designed to care about how others are doing.  There are not supposed to be canned responses to our lives.  If we are going to really live, we must show love to others in every interaction.  I can hear Louie Armstrong singing, “I see friends shaking hands, saying ‘how do you do’; what they’re really saying is ‘I love you.’”  We have lost the freedom to really express our love for each other in the liturgy of the common man.

Liturgy is not wrong but it can become rote and unfeeling unless we fully engage in the conversations we have.  Let us go back to the common service opening.  We do not always engage with the statement, “The Lord be with you.”  We must.  We need to do so.  Someone is expressing the desire that the very God of the Universe be with us.  We wish the same in response.  There is nothing more vital to any human.


It is our obligation to invest love in every encounter.  My liturgy must be uncommon in its level of love and care.  It should reflect the level of engagement with others that should be common.  The only way that we can take on the burden of caring for others is to truly communicate with others.

If I am going to be a true follower of Christ, I must emulate his commitment to really speaking to the hearts and spirits of others.  I must be genuine in my communication and temper it so that it draws others to do the same.  If you wish to try this, Dear Reader, feel free to try it with me.  I want to hear you and see who you really are.  In the meantime, I genuinely wish that the Lord be with you.

Take On Me – A-ha (unplugged)

We're talking away
Though I don't know what I'm to say
I'll say it anyway
Today's another day to find you
Shying away
I'll be coming for your love, OK?
Take on me (take on me)
Take me on (take on me)
I'll be gone
In a day or two

So needless to say,
I'm odds and ends
But I'll be stumbling away
Slowly learning that life is ok
Say after me
It's no better to be safe than sorry
Take on me (take on me)
Take me on (take on me)
I'll be gone
In a day or two

Oh, things that you say
Is it a life or just to play my worries away
You're all the things I've got to remember
You're shying away
I'll be coming for you anyway
Take on me
Take me on
I'll be gone
In a day
(Take on me)
Take me on (take on me)
I'll be gone (take on me)
(Take on me)

Wishing you joy in the journey,

Aramis Thorn
Mat 13:52 So Jesus said to them, "That is why every writer who has become a disciple of Christ’s rule of the universe is like a homeowner. He liberally hands out new and old things from his great treasure store.”
(͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

Contacts for Aramis Thorn:
#aramisthorn
Support Page on Patreon: www.patreon.com/aramisthorn
Novels: From My Publisher or on Amazon                   
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14 January 2020

Liturgy of the Common Man ~ What We Worship


Greetings Dear Reader,

We to consider that we all worship something.  Even if one says he does not believe in God, there is something that receives devotion and laud.  We all have things that are important to us but that is not what I am getting at here.  I am talking about the things that get our devotion and fealty.

The liturgy we form around these things is obvious even though we do not think of it as liturgy.  The easy example is sports.  We wear the colors, cheer the team, and speak the holy words ascribed to our chosen sport.  We are emotionally engaged in wins and losses.  We tithe our pay for tickets.  We have feasts on our tailgates to honor the comradery of our common worship.  We worship our teams to one degree or another.

The liturgy of the common man is filled with worship.  It is within us to worship something.  We may assign this need to science, leisure, art, nature, or food.  We choose what we will worship.  Our hearts and minds become codded in the cants and responses of that which we love.

It is up to me to recognize this liturgy and choose the level in which I participate.  I am not supposed to worship anything other than the Father.  I can enjoy many things without giving myself to them.  Understanding what others worship can help me find common ground and friendship with others.  We can walk together in the enjoyment of shared past times and interests. 

If, however, I am going to be a faithful follower of Christ, I must never join in the liturgy of worship to the point that I compromise my fealty to Jesus.  Do not get me wrong.  I love my Atlanta Braves and want to see every pitch, hit, and run.  I get over-excited about a Jethro Tull concert.  A good meal is a work of art to my eyes, taste, and heart.  What I must not do is cross the line that keeps Christ above and without equal in my mind and heart.

The liturgy of the common man calls me to worship every day.  The horns sound and we are drawn to bow down to things that will never satisfy and will surely disappoint.  I want my entire life to be an act of worship, a prayer of love and gratitude.  I will enjoy the things that the Father provides and share my journey with those who will.  What I want to be is someone who has balance here that reveals my commitment to Christ and all that he has for us.  You are welcome with me on any part of the journey, Dear Reader.  What I want us to share is an understanding that we are all going to worship something, we just need to reason out that it must be the only thing that works.  Our liturgy of the common man must find its true worship in Christ alone.

No Compromise – Keith Green

Make my life a prayer to you
I wanna do what you want me to
No empty words and no white lies
No token prayers no compromise

I wanna shine the light you gave
Through your son, you sent to save us
From ourselves and our despair
It comforts me to know you're really there

Well I wanna thank you now
For being patient with me
Oh it's so hard to see
When my eyes are on me
I guess I'll have to trust
And just believe what you say
Oh you're coming again
Coming to take me away

I wanna die and let you give
Your life to me so I might live
And share the hope you gave me
The love that set me free

I wanna tell the world out there
You're not some fable or fairy tale
That I've made up inside my head
You're God the son and you've risen from the dead

Well I wanna thank you now
For being patient with me
Oh it's so hard to see
When my eyes are on me
I guess I'll have to trust
And just believe what you say
Oh you're coming again
Coming to take me away

I wanna die and let you give
Your life to me so I might live
And share the hope you gave me
The love that set me free

Wishing you joy in the journey,

Aramis Thorn
Mat 13:52 So Jesus said to them, "That is why every writer who has become a disciple of Christ’s rule of the universe is like a homeowner. He liberally hands out new and old things from his great treasure store.”
(͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

Contacts for Aramis Thorn:

#aramisthorn
Support Page on Patreon: www.patreon.com/aramisthorn
Novels: From My Publisher or on Amazon                   
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13 January 2020

Liturgy of the Common Man ~ Opening Thoughts


Greetings Dear Reader,

When this thought came to me, I considered developing it into a book first.  I am not yet at the place where I want to write books that are not fiction or devotionals based on direct interaction with the Bible.  This discussion may become the outline for something in the future, but for now, it will be you and I sharing thoughts around coffee, or the fire, or as we walk home.  You may choose how you want to envision it.

Let us begin with an understanding of what liturgy is.  It is “a rite or body of rites prescribed for public worship, a eucharistic rite, or a customary repertoire of ideas, phrases, or observances.”  The idea is that liturgy offers a common pattern of practice that leads to common worship and common social interaction around it.  In church liturgy, there are often a set of statements and responses that profess faith and unity in belief.

This is not, however, a discussion of church liturgy.  What I wish to ponder and palaver is the liturgy of the common man.  In a larger sense, we have created a social liturgy that prescribes how we act. interact, and react with each other.  It focuses on the last bit of the definition above.  In this liturgy is the common greetings we share, the things that are “politically correct”, and the identity of what we worship. 

I am hoping to build toward a certain and irrefutable understanding of who we are and who we should be on our journey together.  In that hope is my goal to become better at following Christ without being addicted to social prescriptions that are not based in the love that he wishes us to have for all humans.  We all serve something.  We are all on a journey back to God whether we accept it or not. 

Please walk with me Dear Reader as we try and rise above the noise of cantors intoning that we must believe this or that to be socially acceptable.  Let us reason together and take an honest look at our condition.  In every way, I wish to be better as a follower of Christ and as a human.  Your company is always an encouragement and an excellent foil for my thinking.  This path through this may be a little rocky as it challenges liturgy we have echoed for generations.  I am counting on your thoughts and questions to keep me honest.

Wishing you joy in the journey,

Aramis Thorn
Mat 13:52 So Jesus said to them, "That is why every writer who has become a disciple of Christ’s rule of the universe is like a homeowner. He liberally hands out new and old things from his great treasure store.”
(͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

Contacts for Aramis Thorn:
#aramisthorn
Support Page on Patreon: www.patreon.com/aramisthorn
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12 January 2020

Back to Normal ~ Closing Thoughts


Greetings Dear Reader,

We always hear the question, “what is normal?”   Defining it can be very subjective and often elusive.  Normal is the habits we have and the patterns we are used to following.  There are objective norms but they almost always have a range. 

For most of us normal is the routine we follow throughout the week.  It is often seen to us as the drudgery we endure to get to the glimpses of what we would rather be doing.  Instead of pursuing what our hearts desire, we run a path of sustenance that provides necessities but is not rewarding. 

I consider this equation whenever I take on something as “work”.   I do not simply work for pay.  I trade part of my life for pay.  I evaluate if I am willing to trade my life for that thing.  This has led to another, deeper thought about this.  When I give my life to complaints, anger, and offenses, I am trading life for strife.  I am wasting an opportunity to love.

This leads to the idea of examining why we get offended.  We establish a set of norms in our minds defining what is offensive.  We call them pet peeves, last nerves, and triggers.  What we fail to do is own that we choose what will offend us.  We decide where our love and understanding stops and where irritation and anger begin.  I am not saying that there is never justifiable anger or that things do not irritate us.  It is clear, however, that we are a society of people who get offended as a norm. 

As a Christ-follower, I am obligated to have norms that included love, grace, kindness, and peace.  If I am focused on offense, I am not looking for ways to love those around me.  I must move to a place where I refuse to trade life for offenses.  I must become, as much as is possible for a human, unoffendable.  Building the norm of focusing on love of others is a great start.  It will take intention to realign my long patterns of thought to a place where my norms of offense no longer exist.

I must also understand that the cross and the gospel are offensive to others.  For some reason, kindness and love can often be met with anger and offense.  I cannot allow the offense that others feel mitigate my willingness to deal with others in love and grace.  As I walk through this year, we will often revisit this idea of being unoffendable.  We will look at every topic through the lenses of love and being unable to be offended.  We will begin tomorrow by beginning to deconstruct the Liturgy of the Common Man.  I will explain that then as promised.  Thank you for your time and company, Dear Reader.  Your companionship in the journey is priceless.

Wishing you joy in the journey,

Aramis Thorn
Mat 13:52 So Jesus said to them, "That is why every writer who has become a disciple of Christ’s rule of the universe is like a homeowner. He liberally hands out new and old things from his great treasure store.”
(͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

Contacts for Aramis Thorn:
#aramisthorn
Support Page on Patreon: www.patreon.com/aramisthorn
Novels: From My Publisher or on Amazon          
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11 January 2020

Second Thoughts ~ Killing Characters


Greetings Dear Reader,

My friend Penny (the best author marketing solution out there) posted a question today that was humorous and enjoyable.  It also struck a more serious chord in me.  Her question was this, “Do authors cry when they kill the best character, or do they smile, laugh, and have a cup of tea with Satan?” 

My response was more serious than her meme:
“My editor actually called me at 2 in the morning crying because I killed a character she loved. She was mad at me for weeks. I feel the pain when I kill any character. As Donn said, ‘every man's death diminishes me.’ I think for writers it is even the imaginary ones. Then again, we can resurrect them by writing prequels.”

I want to walk through my thoughts on this by letting you get to know one of my characters who appears in four of my novels.  His name is Patrius.  He is a Roman Centurion.  He is also a man who hates where he is stationed, the people he is responsible to control, and Jews in general. 

I felt that his character was a bit flat in The Foster Father of God.  At the time I did not realize how important he would become to me.  Keep in mind that this man is a killer.  He likes hurting people and plays a key role in how things unfold for Joseph, Jesus, and the world in which they walk. 

That said, I realized that I had to flesh him out a little more in The Praetor and I put him in the midst of the action.  Then I killed him.  I realized that he deserved more.  There is more to his story than had been told.  Even the vilest among us is still a human loved by God and worth the effort of redemption.  There is always a reason why people reject love and grace.  I had to give him more facets and allow him to be who he is.

Then I started writing the prequel that overlaps The Foster Father of God.  He plays a more significant role in Magi: The Gift Bringers (to be published Christmas 2020).  I take the time to show his journey toward who he became.  He does not magically become a better man.  We can, however, better understand him.  We can find enough of him to love him and wish that he had chosen to be a better man.

Every man’s death, even the fictional ones, diminishes me.   To be an honest author I have to have men who are flawed, fallen, and refuse reclamation.  I would rather that real stories included a happy ending for everyone.   I would rather give you an honest story than a magical lie.  So, we must see that killing our secondary and sometimes our main characters are necessary to an honest tale.   After all, the Father killed the most beloved character in the narrative that allows all our stories.  If Jesus does not die, there is no redemption, and all is really lost.  Fortunately, the author and finisher of our faith sees fit to resurrect the main character from the dead.  The rest is hope and opportunity.  It is a tale worth knowing and telling.  We are the sub-creators who get to tell tales that mirror his grand tale.
 
Wishing you joy in the journey,

Aramis Thorn
Mat 13:52 So Jesus said to them, "That is why every writer who has become a disciple of Christ’s rule of the universe is like a homeowner. He liberally hands out new and old things from his great treasure store.”
(͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

Contacts for Aramis Thorn:
#aramisthorn
Support Page on Patreon: www.patreon.com/aramisthorn
Novels: From My Publisher or on Amazon                 
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Back to Normal ~ Anticipated Angst


Greetings Dear Reader,

I was reading about the formation of community this past month in anticipation of our weekly life-group study being on that topic.  We have a central book that we will go through and I will read that on pace with the group.  I do, however, like to be up to speed on the current thought in the area. 

One of the thoughts that reached deep inside of me was an analysis of how people think about each other.  The summation was that so many people walk around interacting with others wondering, “how are you going to hurt me.”  This struck me at a very visceral level.  It is at the core of the fear that keeps us from loving others and causes us to take offense so easily.

From our view God to our thoughts about the stranger on the corner, we have adopted a culture of fear and anger.  We have turned pain into anticipation of pain and angst.  We debilitate ourselves because of what “might” happen.  We use our vast creativity to imagine things and base our lives on those horrid imaginations.  Imagining the worst becomes our normal when we are supposed to anticipate the Father doing better than the very best we can imagine.

The journey we are on does have real pain and danger.  We do have fears and angst.  We also build a culture around it where we imagine the worst and sometimes aid in creating it.  If we proceed instead to do everything out of love and create a norm where we are unoffendable, we can possibly find a path where things are more beautiful, richer, and deeper.  We can have lives where the offered angst of others washes over us.  We can refuse to have that norm be ours.

As I draw toward the close of this short series, I plan to focus for a few days next week on the core of my platform for this year.  I wish to build on the foundation of love in every moment a year’s worth of learning to be unoffendable.   This will help me to love others at every turn.  It will also keep me from carrying anger or hurt for too long.  It will limit the avenues through which I can be angered or hurt.  I look forward to the ways in which this unfolds and hope that you can walk with me.  I always value the ways we navigate the journey together.  As always, your thoughts and questions are precious to me.

Wishing you joy in the journey,

Aramis Thorn
Mat 13:52 So Jesus said to them, "That is why every writer who has become a disciple of Christ’s rule of the universe is like a homeowner. He liberally hands out new and old things from his great treasure store.”
(͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

Contacts for Aramis Thorn:
#aramisthorn
Support Page on Patreon: www.patreon.com/aramisthorn
Novels: From My Publisher or on Amazon          
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10 January 2020

Back to Normal ~ Meat Tenderizer


Greetings Dear Reader,

Have you ever considered how meat tenderizer works?  “The two main ingredients in most powdered tenderizers are papain, found in papayas, and bromelain, found in pineapples. Both enzymes attack the muscle fibers and the collagen webs that holds them together. This softens the meat and makes it more tender. It is also why you cannot put raw papaya or pineapple in gelatin desserts. The papain and bromelain break down the gelatin, just as they do the collagen in meats.”

That will handle the cooking lesson for the morning except to remind us that meat is muscle tissue.  That is important to my thoughts this morning.  You see, the heart is a muscle.  The holiday season acts as a meat tenderizer on many people but we then get back to “normal”.  It is like we sprinkle meat hardener on our hearts.  The yielded grace, kindness, and generosity are locked back inside until the cycle returns. 

We do not have to un-soften our hearts.  We are not obligated to put away compassion and joy with the lights and wrapping.  It is always allowed that we have a heart that is loving and kind.  It can be hard to tenderize our hearts.  Fortunately, there is a remedy for that.  The Father wishes for us to remain tenderhearted towards him.  He says in Ezekiel, I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you; I will remove from you your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh. And I will put my Spirit in you and move you to follow my decrees and be careful to keep my laws.”

If we choose to avoid getting back to normal, we can create a new norm of tenderness to the Spirit moving us to continue in generosity, joy, kindness, and love. The way of things is to become closed to the joy that is available to us every day.  We can remain tenderhearted.  We can choose to set a new level in our lives. 

To continue to walk on the foundation of love, we must keep our hearts tender and pliable.  We have all had tough steaks that could have used some meat tenderizer.  We have all encountered people whose hearts are hard.  There are times when life pushes us to be hardhearted.  The busyness of business drives us to forget that other humans need the beauty of our kindness and love in every situation. 

I must have a laser focus on my love and kindness for others.  I must be so engaged in loving others that everyday offenses that harden my heart are ineffective.  I must yield to the Spirit moving me to keep the law of Christ in everything.  The law is founded on this, Dear Reader: loving the Father with all our heart, mind, soul, and strength and loving other humans unconditionally.  If we do this, our hearts become tender.  We may be hurt or saddened by others but we will not take up offenses.  I know that this is the path I must walk.  I hope you can keep me company on it.  I love you and treasure your companionship.   

Wishing you joy in the journey,

Aramis Thorn
Mat 13:52 So Jesus said to them, "That is why every writer who has become a disciple of Christ’s rule of the universe is like a homeowner. He liberally hands out new and old things from his great treasure store.”
(͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

Contacts for Aramis Thorn:
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Support Page on Patreon: www.patreon.com/aramisthorn
Novels: From My Publisher or on Amazon          
Web Page:  www.aramisthorn.com
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